Monday, October 9, 2017

Avocado Salad

Visiting people can be a bit rough, especially when I'm hungry and the kitchen is filled with fatty smells like cheesy quiche, fresh-made cinnamon rolls or hot bagels, and then of course coffee. Well, while the others were making quiche muffins wrapped in vegetarian "bacon" and toasting their breads and brewing their coffee, I was making my own breakfast ... a massive salad. But LOL, one of the others decided that the salad would be much more satisfying and asked for a bowl also ... to go along with a quiche muffin. 

Anyway, one thing about eating fresh whole foods, I don't have food cravings like other people. I've read about this and people who nourish their bodies with plant foods (which are rich in vitamins and minerals) are satisfying their bodies and therefore feeding their bodies. It's the "starved" body that has cravings! With all the avocado fat on the salad, I was very satisfied and didn't feel hungry until the next meal ... when of course everyone was hungry. I think they had pizza and I was back foraging in the fridge for another salad.


Now THAT is a salad!

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

10 of the Most Powerful Herbs and Spices

Nature is filled with herbs and spices, and after reading about some of various herbs and spices healing qualities, I incorporated them into my diet to help me fight against the evil systemic candida. All of the 10 items on this list, except for fenugreek, were frequently used, and they sure did make my simple all-natural diet tasty. 
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Ten of the Most Powerful Healing Herbs and Spices

Some of the most powerful healers can be found in the kitchen - herbs and spices. These wonderfully fragrant and flavor-enhancing additions to food also contain a wealth of natural healing properties that have a number of diverse benefits, from aiding digestion to reducing the risk of cancer.

All herbs and spices contain substances that promote healing, and here are just ten of the most powerful ones, and some reasons why you should be using them in cooking and as health-enhancers:
  • 1. Cinnamon - cinnamon bark contains an oil-like substance that kills a variety of illness causing bacteria, including E.coli and Salmonella, and research shows that cinnamon is able to stop the growth of the Asian flu virus. Cinnamon has a surprisingly strong effect on the brain and mood; its distinctive smell helps to reduce anxiety and stress, increase alertness, and prevent mood swings caused by fluctuating blood-sugar levels.
  • 2. Turmeric - turmeric contains curcumin, a powerful antioxidant chemical that detoxifies carcinogens and calms inflammation, making it useful for easing auto-immune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and allergies. It appears to work just like non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, without the side effects. Turmeric is such as strong anti-inflammatory that only a small amount is enough to reduce the risk of illness. Curcumin, which gives this spice its vivid golden color, also helps to prevent the build up of fatty deposits in the arteries, and so may protect against conditions such as Alzheimer's and heart disease.
  • 3. Basil - basil contains volatile oils, which account for the medicinal properties of this herb. It relieves flatulence, is an aid to digestion and its antiseptic properties are said to benefit acne. This fragrant oil also has antimicrobial effects. Recent tests have found that basil oils can counteract the growth of antibiotic-resistant superbugs, including those that cause food poisoning and others that infect wounds.
  • 4. Cloves - clove oil is 60 to 90 percent eugenol, a potent pain-relieving compound, effective for numbing the pain toothache, headaches, and other areas of pain, such as the joints. As well as their anesthetic effects, cloves combat the bacterial infection and inflammation that can lead to gum disease and the risk of further damage to teeth.
  • 5. Cumin - cumin seeds are valued for their digestive benefits. Cumin relieves wind and can prevent digestive upsets such as diarrhea. This is thought to be because these small seeds stimulate the production of pancreatic enzymes that help the body break down foods and absorb the nutrients. This fragrant spice is a source of iron and is rich in essential oils. Regularly eating cumin is associated with blood glucose-lowering effects.
    Chewing a few seeds of cumin sweetens the breath after eating a meal. End a meal by chewing a blend of cuminseedsfennelcloves and cardamom to enhance digestion.
  • 6. Fennel - Rich in volatile oils, fennel is a carminative herb, meaning that it can ease bloating, flatulence, and digestive spasms. As well as digestion, scientific research has demonstrated fennel's anti-cancer, intestinal health and eye health benefits. Fennel seeds can also reduce bad breath and body odor. The fennel bulb contains a significant amount of Vitamin C, and is a source of fiberfolate and potassium, making it a powerful antioxidant herb.
  • 7. Mint - mint is widely used as a highly effective digestive aid, and to counteract nausea and vomiting. Mint improves fat digestion and is an effective antacid, due to its essential oils. Peppermint oil is still the basis for many indigestion remedies, because it is extremely soothing to the stomach lining. Mint tea is not only beneficial for digestion; it is a simple treatment for stress-induced headaches. Chewing the leaves or drinking the tea stimulates the cortex of the brain to improve concentration and induce relaxation.
  • 8. Oregano - One tablespoon of oregano has about the same antioxidant capacity as one banana or a cup of string beans. Its antioxidant qualities combat the conditions of aging, especially heart disease and cancers. Oregano contains at least four compounds that soothe coughs and 19 chemicals with antibacterial action, which are associated with offering protection against food-borne diseases. Freshly-picked oregano leaves are the most effective.
  • 9. Parsley - parsley is rich in essential oils, and contains Vitamin A, C, and some iron and calcium. It is a diuretic and digestive herb, helping to prevent problems such as kidney stones and bladder infections, and keeping the body's plumbing running smoothly by causing it to produce more urine. It also aids in the elimination of uric acid - useful for arthritis, rheumatism or gout, and it is an effective breath freshener because it contains high levels of chlorophyll.
  • 10. Fenugreek - fenugreek is rich in vitamins A and C, and iron and phosphorus. Studies have shown that fenugreek is a potent stimulator of breast milk production in nursing mothers. Fenugreek seeds have also been found to protect against cancers of the colon and breast, and have anti-diabetic effects. The regular intake of fenugreek seeds helps to purify the blood, flush out harmful toxins and lowers the risk of a heart attack.

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Three Salsas (raw)

These three salsa are great for parties, nights in front the TV, or even for packing in lunches. Guaranteed to be a family favorite!

Cucumber-onion Salsa

2 cucumbers diced
1 small onion thinly sliced
1 T. freshly squeezed lemon juice
salt and black pepper to taste
fresh dillweed


Sour Apple-onion Salsa

2 Granny Smith apples, cubed
1 small onion, thinly sliced
1 clove garlic, minced
2 t. cumin powder
2 t. freshly squeezed lemon juice
fresh cilantro
salt to taste




Parsley-tomato Salsa

1 thick bunch of fresh parsley, chopped
2 tomatoes, diced
1 cucumber, diced
1-2 T. freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 small onion, diced
1 clove garlic, minced
Salt and pepper to taste


Excellent for serving with hummus cups and chips for dipping. (Chips here are El Matador corn chips -- for some reason those corn chips don't bother me, black bean chips, and Cheeze its, which of course I can't eat but everyone else could.) 



Positively divine and so simple!

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Vitamin A: Necessary Growth Factor

Vitamin A is an absolutely vital vitamin for maintaining health, and unfortunately people with systemic candida often have deficiencies of the vitamin. In the early period of my systemic candida, I kept having weird eye, neural and other symptoms, and because of my horrendous eye problems, decided to get a vitamin A test. Sure enough, a deficiency! And it kept getting worse, not better, even with supplementation, which I then read in Supplements Exposed that supplements didn't boost vitamin A levels at all. So I tested out that theory, and sure enough, my vitamin A levels didn't budge even though I was taking powerful daily doses of vitamin A. Even now, in 2017, I still have a big vitamin A deficiency. My diet was ultra-strict before to control the systemic candida, and now that I'm a lot better, I'm really trying to eat as much vitamin A-rich foods ... the numbers have improved a bit, but I'm still deficient.

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Vitamin A was identified as a necessary growth factor in 1915 and was the first vitamin to be discovered. It is obtained from food in a combination of two different forms: as pre-formed vitamin A and as pro-vitamin A, which the body can convert to vitamin A as necessary. Pre-formed vitamin A, often in the form of retinal or retinal [sic], is found in foods of animal origin while pro-vitamin A, of which beta-carotene is the best known form, is found in orange, yellow and dark green vegetables and fruits. Both forms are fat soluble.

What does it do for your body? 
EYES - Vitamin A is essential for eyes to function effectively. It is involved in the growth and repair of the eye and in the production of a chemical called visual purple, which helps in night vision.

EPITHELIAL CELLS - Vitamin A is involved in the growth and repair of epithelial cells. These cells cover the internal and external surfaces of the body and are found in the skin, lungs, developing teeth, inner ear, cornea of the eye, sex organs, glands and their ducts, gums, nose, cervix and other areas. This growth and maintenance role is vital for many bodily functions. For example, the good health of the digestive tract lining is important in protecting against ulcers and maintenance of the lining of the vagina and uterus which are important in fertility.

PREGNANCY - Vitamin A is necessary in pregnancy for the development of the embryo.

NERVES - Vitamin A is involved in the production of membranes and of myelin, which coats the nerves.

GLANDS AND HORMONES - Vitamin A plays a role in the maintenance of the adrenal gland and synthesis of certain hormones such as thyroid hormone.

THE IMMUNE SYSTEM - Vitamin A is known as "the anti-infective vitamin" as it is vital for the development of the body’s natural defenses. It stimulates and enhances many immune functions. This immune enhancing function promotes healing of tissues and increases resistance to infection.

Adequate vitamin A intake, either from diet or supplements, is very important especially for children. Many studies have found that vitamin A supplementation reduces the risk of infectious diseases in areas where vitamin A deficiency is widespread. 
A recent research review of several studies found that adequate vitamin A intake in children resulted in many health benefits. Children in developing countries are often at high risk of vitamin A deficiency. In developed countries, ensuring adequate vitamin A intake is particularly important for immune support.

GROWTH AND BONE FORMATION - Vitamin A is necessary for growth and the formation of bones and teeth, collagen synthesis, cartilage synthesis and wound healing.

ANTIVIRAL ACTIVITY - Laboratory experiments have shown vitamin A to have antiviral activity.
Absorption 

The presence of fat and bile in the intestines is necessary for vitamin A absorption. Around 80 to 90% of vitamin A in the diet is absorbed although this is reduced in older people and those who have trouble absorbing fat, such as pancreatitis, celiac disease and cystic fibrosis sufferers, who may run the risk of vitamin A deficiency. 

Vitamin A is joined to fatty acids in the intestinal lining, combined with other substances and transported to the liver, which stores 90% of the body’s vitamin A. 

Deficiency

Vitamin A deficiency is relatively rare in developed countries and is usually limited to those who have absorption difficulties, liver disease or who drink a lot of alcohol. Vitamin A deficiency is common in alcoholics and contributes to some of the disorders of alcoholism such as night blindness, skin problems, cirrhosis of the liver and susceptibility to infections. 

Vitamin A deficiency symptoms: 
EYES - One of the first symptoms of deficiency is night blindness due to lack of visual purple. Prolonged deficiency leads to xerophthalmia, a condition in which eyes become dry, ulcers appear on the cornea, the eyelids become swollen and sticky and which eventually leads to blindness. Vitamin A deficiency is the leading preventable cause of blindness in developing countries.

SKIN - Prolonged deficiency leads to thickened dry skin which is prone to infections. Small hardened bumps of a protein known as keratin may develop around the hair follicles.

GROWTH - Deficiency causes growth retardation, weight loss, diarrhea, thickening of bone shafts, congenital malformations, impaired hearing, taste and smell, wasting of testicles and reduced sperm count. Inadequate vitamin A intake may lead to improper tooth formation in children and to gum disease.

IMMUNE SYSTEM - Epithelial surfaces are adversely affected by vitamin A deficiency causing increased susceptibility to skin and respiratory infections. Immune cells and antibody functions are also affected which may lead to an increase in pre-cancerous cells in the epithelial tissues of the mouth, throat and lungs.

THYROID GLAND - A deficiency of vitamin A can contribute to lower levels of active thyroid hormone with symptoms of low body temperature, depression, difficulty in losing weight, headaches and lethargy.
Therapeutic uses 
Vitamin A supplements are used in developing countries to prevent or treat deficiency and to protect immune system function.  
SKIN DISORDERS - The vitamin A derivatives etretinate and isotretinoin are used topically to treat psoriasis. These compounds inhibit the formation of some of the toxic compounds which may be responsible for the high rate of cell division causing the scaly build up on the skin.
Other Uses
Vitamin eye drops have been used to treat dry eyes.

Creams containing vitamin A have been used to heal wounds in patients taking corticosteroid drugs.
Interactions
Vitamin E and zinc are necessary for vitamin A metabolism, including absorption, transport and release from the liver. Vitamin E may protect against some of the effects of excess vitamin A.

Vitamin A is necessary for calcium metabolism in the formation of healthy bones and teeth.

Vitamin A absorption is reduced by mineral oil laxatives, which bind it. Antacids, the anti-gout drug colchicine, and the cholesterol reducing drug, cholestyramine inhibit vitamin A absorption.

Alcohol irritates the digestive tract and inhibits the absorption of vitamin A while also depleting the body’s tissue stores.
Cautions
Pre-formed vitamin A supplements in doses of more than 3000 mg RE should not be taken by women who may become pregnant. Pro-vitamin A, or beta-carotene are safe for pregnant women. 
Vitamin A supplements should not be taken with isotretinoin or etretinate for skin disease or in cases of impaired liver or kidney function. If vitamin A supplements are taken with large amounts of alcohol, liver damage may occur.

Broad spectrum antibiotics should not be taken with high doses of vitamin A.
Sources of Vitamin A

  • in leafy green vegetables
  • in yellow fruits and vegetables
  • in the liver oils of the cod and other fish
  • in milk, cheese, butter and egg yolk

Monday, June 26, 2017

Stuffed Grape-leaves

Yum! Stuffed grape leaves! But they're only good before the leaves get tough from sun exposure or before they get " too old", like in July or later. To find the best grape leaves, look under the plants and preferably in the shadows or areas where the sun doesn't reach much. The easiest grape leaves for wrapping are the ones with the longer stems, but that can pose a problem as the longer stemmed ones are often the not so tender ones.

To make the stuffed grape leaves, I picked a number of tender leaves, rinsed them well in water and then soaked them for 30 minutes (to further soften them) while I was whipping up the "stuffing".



The "stuffing" is quite simple:

1 small onion finely diced
1 medium-large tomato, diced (removing skin is optional)
5-6 garlic cloves, minced
2-3 cup brown rice (takes longer to cook but has richer flavor - 
the brown rice cooks faster if allowed to marinate in the other flavors for 30 min or so)
2 T. fresh lemon juice
small amount of lemon zest (optional)
salt and black pepper to taste


Put 1-2 tablespoons on each grape leave and tuck the leaves around, to finally wrap the long stem around the outside "package" and hopefully tuck the stem end under the stem on the other side to lock it in place. The grape leaves will unwrap if not secured, so I have also used thread or a clean string (as can be seen in the final picture).



Once the grape leaves are all stuffed and securely tied, pour water over them to cover and then liberally pour on olive oil. Turn on low heat and allow to simmer-cook, approximately 50 minutes (brown rice takes longer to cook). Watch the pot and add water if necessary to keep the leaves from scorching.


Place on a serving dish and serve. Removing the tough stem and certainly the string before serving might be a good aesthetic choice.

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Toxic Clothing - Slowing Killing

The following was published by Lee Euler (editor) of Cancer Defeated Newsletter, Newsletter #111


I'm mindful of the problem because (cancer concerns aside) I'm sensitive to a wide range of chemicals -- including those found in some types of cloth. A few years ago I bought a beautiful set of sheets from a fancy store. The label said they were100 percent cotton, but after sleeping in them a few nights I was in bone and muscle pain from head to toe. Repeated washings didn't get out whatever the offending substance was.

I got a terrible reaction from the dyes or maybe the chemicals used to make those all-cotton sheets "no-iron". You can only imagine what true synthetic cloth can do to us. It's largely a product of the oil industry.


The Toxins Lurking in Your Clothing...

We have the illusion that clothes made from synthetic fibers are safe, but the materials are in fact full of invisible chemicals the clothing industry prefers we don't think about.

A hundred years ago, clothing was made of natural fibers like cotton, flax, wool, and silk. In the early 1900s synthetics were developed.

Although rayon was introduced in 1924, the first truly synthetic fiber was nylon, made by DuPont from the petro-molecule toluene. Nylon because a popular material for women's panty hose.


Other synthetics followed: 
  • Acrylic (1950), aka, "wash-and-wear" fabrics — a "revolutionary time-saving leap" for homemakers 
  • Polyester (1953), "wrinkle free" fabrics developed from xylene and ethylene
  • Spandex and olefin (1959), which became the mainstay of sportswear, swim suits, and thermal underwear. Olefin is produced by "cracking" petroleum molecules into propylene and ethylene gases. 
Today's clothing (a $7 trillion/year industry) is manufactured using an astounding 8,000 synthetic chemicals.

Nowadays, clothes also contain toxins like formaldehyde, brominated flame retardants, and perfluorinated chemicals (Teflon) to provide "non-iron" and "non-wrinkle" qualities. Insecticides are even applied in the name of good health!

For half a century, skin and chemicals have been interacting… creating problems like infertility, respiratory diseases, contact dermatitis, and cancer. The more synthetic clothing you wear, the greater your risk of absorbing toxic chemicals that harm your health.


The Problems with Synthetics…

When toxins are absorbed through your skin — your largest organ — they bypass your liver, the organ responsible for removing toxins. You also may not realize that your skin keeps you healthy by venting toxins… up to a pound per day.

Petrochemical fibers restrict and suffocate your skin — shutting down toxic release. Meanwhile, they contribute to your total toxic burden and may become the "tipping point" for triggering the onset of disease.

Two contributing factors are (1) toxic buildup in your body and (2) multiple chemicals that interact together to create even worse problems than the individual chemicals by themselves.

Skin rashes, nausea, fatigue, burning, itching, headaches, and difficulty breathing are all associated with chemical sensitivity. If you have mysterious health symptoms that you can't seem to get control over, it's worth checking out whether your clothes could be the problem.


The Chemicals You Wear Every Day…

With a "mere" 8,000 chemicals used in clothing manufacture, it's a sure bet you're wearing many as you read this. Let's highlight some of the worst. 

These kinds of fabric finishes "scream" chemicals...
  • Easy Care — Wrinkle free, shrinkage free garments release formaldehyde. 
  • Water Repellent — Fluoropolymers (as in Teflon) are used to repel oil and water 
  • Flame Retardants 
  • Bacterial and fungicidal chemicals — Triclosan and nano-particles are used for this. 
Formaldehyde is linked to a 30% increase in lung cancer, plus skin/lung irritation and contact dermatitis. It is found in fabrics claiming to be: 
  • Anti-cling, anti-static, anti-shrink 
  • Waterproof 
  • Perspiration-proof 
  • Moth-proof and mildew resistant 
  • Chorine resistant 
It's also used in dyes and printing to fix the design and prevent "running". 

Most governments restrict formaldehyde levels in clothing… but not the U.S. One of the worst offenders is China. Beware of "Made in China" labels.

Use of formaldehyde in clothing is extremely widespread. There have even been lawsuits alleging high levels of it in Victoria's Secret bras.

High temps and humidity make "poison clothes" even worse — they open your pores and increase chemical absorption.

And you absorb formaldehyde from multiple sources daily, so don't be fooled by manufacturers' reassurances.

Disperse Blue Dyes may look gorgeous — even regal — but they put you at high risk for contact dermatitis… especially dark blue, brown, and black synthetic clothing. It's important to note — laundering does not reverse that risk. Worse… Disperse Blue 1 is classified as a human carcinogen due to high malignant tumor levels in lab animals.

Incidentally, you might be interested to know that this dye also shows up in cosmetics and semi-permanent hair dyes.

Fire and burn hazards: The Marine Corps now prohibits troops in Iraq from wearing synthetic clothing while off base… after too many unfortunate burns from soldiers wearing polyester, acrylic, and nylon — which readily melt in high heat and fuse to the skin. (Dudes, what did you expect? The stuff is a first cousin to plastic. Both are products of the oil industry.)

Of course, that begs the question of whether flame retardants are safer… Flame Retardant use began in 1971, when government required children's sleepwear to be self-extinguishing. The solution was to add brominated Tris. 

Studies measuring urine samples showed that this chemical is readily absorbed. Brominated Tris is a mutagen, and causes cancer and sterility in animals. (Mutagens cause inheritable mutations by damaging DNA.) They also cause testicular atrophy and sterility.

Tris was banned in children's clothing in 1977 (but lives on in upholstered furniture foam, baby carriers, and bassinets). Today most synthetic fabrics contain a new generation of flame retardants bonded into the fabric, which must survive 50+ washings.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Burn Center, only 36 children a year suffer serious injuries from sleepwear catching fire. My heart goes out to these tragic victims and their families. But is the toxic contamination of millions of children worth protecting 36 children per year from burns?

This sort of regulation is a product of the "precautionary principle" — the notion that there should be no limit to the amount of money spent or the amount of inconvenience inflicted on millions of people when it comes to preventing rare dangers that affect a tiny number of people. The mania for making our society risk-proof and accident-proof actually increases danger in many cases.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission exempts certain sleepwear from flammability standards. Two companies selling kids' sleepwear without flame retardants are L.L. Bean and Lands' End.

But it's not just children's sleepwear… Demand is high for fire-retardant uniforms and civilian clothing. 

Lab studies show that flame retardants (PBDEs) can cause a slew of health issues — thyroid problems, brain damage, ADHD symptoms, and fertility problems.

The insecticide permethrin is now in civilian outdoor wear and military uniforms even though no long-term studies have assessed its safety. We wrote about this dangerous chemical in Issue #89. You can see it at www.cancerdefeated.com/newsletters.

Silver nanoparticles in name-brand clothing create anti-odor, anti-wrinkle, and anti-stain clothes. "Nano" means "really tiny"… super-microscopic. Nano-particles in clothing can create easily absorbed toxins that, due to their miniscule size, are transported into all your organs, including your brain… consequences unknown.

Other scary toxins include sulfuric acid, urea resin, sulfonamides, halogens, and sodium hydroxide.


The Health Hazards of Built-Up Electrical Charges…

Electrostatic charges accumulate in synthetic clothing. There are stories of shocking mini-explosions from mixing layers of synthetic clothing with synthetic carpeting.


And get this: synthetic undergarments contribute to infertility in men.


A 24-month study of male dogs wearing either loose-fitting polyester underpants or loose-fitting cotton ones showed that wearing polyester created significant decreases in sperm count and degeneration of the testes. The animals wearing cotton suffered no side effects. (And, please, no letters to the editor about dogs wearing underwear. I agree, it sounds silly.)

Scientists think polyester traps body heat, encourages chemical absorption, and creates electrostatic build-up… which all affect sperm count.


Is Tight Fitting Clothing a Problem?


The short answer is "yes".

We recently ran an article on the risks of wearing bras, especially tight ones (Issue #65).

Probably the most unsafe clothing item ever introduced in the name of fashion was the corset. It squeezed women's bodies and crushed their internal organs to the point of broken ribs.

Today, some scientists believe restrictive bras suppress the lymphatic system — which flushes toxins from your breasts and lymph nodes and helps prevent breast cancer.

Anna Maria Clement and Brian R. Clement, co-authors of the book Killer Clothes, recommend limiting bra usage as much as possible.

Your shoes might also fit the category of tight clothing. A 2009 survey of 2,000 people found that 40% of women buy and wear uncomfortable shoes to make a fashion statement. By contrast, just 17% of men did likewise.


Synthetics Hurt Athletic Outcomes…

Despite the wide appeal of synthetic athletic apparel, medical studies show that synthetic fibers cause muscle fatigue — which can mean the difference between winning and losing for competitive athletes.

In a study of 24 27-year-old men, natural linen long-sleeved shirts were worn for five hours -- and then polyester ones were worn for another five hours. Their arms were monitored during both, with electrodes measuring skin temperature and velocity of the men's muscle tissue.1

No changes were measured when they wore the linen. But when they donned polyester they endured a range of muscle disruptions…


The Bottom Line…

It's important to realize that while individual chemicals might not endanger your health, the synergistic effect of multiple chemicals interacting can have unpredictable negative effects.

Natural and organic clothing is becoming more popular again. But it can still be a challenge to find it, and you may have to piece together items from multiple suppliers. Here's empowerment for the process…

Priority #1 — Choose natural fibers
  1. Cotton — preferably organic. It still remains the "king" of textiles. Organic accounts for less than 1% of worldwide production
  2. Flax — one of nature's strongest fibers
  3. Hemp — grows without any need for fungicides, herbicides, or pesticides because it's naturally insect-resistant. Its fibers are reported to be four times stronger than cotton. This is NOT the hemp known for its mind-altering properties! 
  4. Silk — known as the "queen of fabrics". Watch out for the use of synthetic dyes in silk. 
  5. Wool — most of today's wool is contaminated with chemicals, i.e., pesticides used to kill parasites. But organic wool is becoming more common. 
  6. Other — alpaca, angora, camel, cashmere, mohair, ramie, aluyot
Incidentally, the Organic Trade Association estimates that one non-organic cotton T-shirt uses one-third pound of pesticides and fertilizers. Cotton production uses one-fourth of all the world's fertilizers.2 It's another good reason to choose organic cotton to add to the ones above.

Here are some sources to get you started in your search for healthier clothes. 
  • Hempest.com 
  • Patagonia (small line of organic clothing) 
  • Ecowise.com 
  • Fairindigo.com 
  • Faeriesdance.com 
  • Kasperorganics.com 
  • Juteandjackfruit.com 
Start small… Choose organic for clothing closest to your skin most of the time — underwear, sleepwear, camisoles, and the like… and then build as you replace items in your closet. Move in a healthier direction with your clothing to drastically reduce your chemical load.

Kindest regards,

Lee Euler,
Publisher

Friday, April 21, 2017

Mung Bean Noodles in Lemon-marinade

Alternatively known as Marinated Pasta Salad:
1 package buckwheat noodles (gluten-free!)
2/3 cup broccoli florets
1/2 cup yellow squash, diced
1/2 small sweet onion, diced
several parsley sprigs
2 small roma tomatoes, diced
several fresh basil leaves
Marinade: 
4 T. lemon/lime juice
5 T. olive oil
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 t. salt
pepper as desired



Version 2: Vary the greens used, add herbs to the basic marinade, vary the presentation!
Always enjoy!